What is a Multiple Choice Test?

Multiple choice test questions, also known as items, can be an effective and efficient way to assess learning outcomes. Multiple choice test items have several potential advantages:

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 of How to Pass Multiple Choice Tests was reviewed by  on November 27, 2015.

Tips for Multiple Choice Test Questions

One of the biggest questions we consistently ask ourselves – and our endearing administrators beg of us – is “How do we know students are learning?” To answer this question we devise an endless varieties of assessments. Among these, the multiple choice test has endured as one of the most common forms of assessment. From our personalized classroom tests to national standardized ones, options A, B, C, D, and E are the ones our students appear most familiar with. But, as with all forms of assessment, there are several benefits to the multiple choice test, but also many pitfalls. We must ensure we are selecting the right assessments and designing it to maximize its purpose.

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Multiple choice testing has changed dramatically over time. The earliest tests were marked by hand, question by question. Then came answer keys – templates that test markers could place over the tests to identify which bubbles were filled correctly. Later, computers were able to score the bubbles. Over the years, however, computer based tests (CBT) […]

Following are additional specific strategies that can be used when taking multiple choice tests:
Multiple choice tests are used everywhere - from getting a driving license to college and job applications. This makes them a vital skill to master. In theory, picking one of four or five options seems easy, but in practice eliminating the wrong answers and picking the right ones can be tough. They might not be questions at all, they could be statements, incomplete sentences or problems to solve. Add time pressure into the mix and your task gets even harder. To ace any multiple choice test you need to have a good knowledge of the syllabus applied with an intelligent strategy and tactics. Learning from these tools and techniques will give you the confidence to face any multiple choice test.Although no specific techniques can be applied to all multiple choice tests, the following are frequently means of getting points out of questions for which you don't really know the answers.Problem Description: A multiple choice test has four possible answers to each of 16 questions. A student quesses the answer to each question, i.e., the probability of getting a correct answer on any given question is 0.25. The conditions of the binomial experiment are assumed to be met: n = 16 questions constitute the trials; each question results in one of two possible outcomes (correct or incorrect); the probability of being correct is 0.25 and is constant if no knowledge about the subject is assumed; the questions are answered independently if the student's answer to a question in no way influences his/her answer to another question.The answer is c, mainly because it is the longest and most complete. Usually a test writer makes up a multiple choice test by leafing through the material to be tested. He may come upon a statement that seems to provide a question and answer, and he bases the multiple choice item on this. Test writers in a hurry write as few words as they can get away with. Therefore, they skimp when they are writing incorrect choices on a multiple choice test. The best way to determine length is to compare the number of words used in the answer. The physical length is less important. Usually the choice containing the most words is the right answer.
Welsh, A. L. "Multiple Choice Objective Tests." In P. Saunders, A. L. Welsh, and W. L.

Understand how multiple choice tests work

One of the most popular methods of testing, multiple choice tests are a part of nearly every student's life. From elementary school to the SATs, it's likely you'll have to take many multiple choice tests in your academic career. By understanding the proper way to study for, take, and learn from multiple choice tests, you can approach these exams with more confidence. See Step 1 for more information.

More on Multiple Choice Tests

Writing Good Multiple Choice Test Questions

One of the most popular methods of testing, multiple choice tests are a part of nearly every student's life. From elementary school to the SATs, it's likely you'll have to take many multiple choice tests in your academic career. By understanding the proper way to study for, take, and learn from multiple choice tests, you can approach these exams with more confidence. See Step 1 for more information.

If you're struggling despite your hard work,  will help you get the marks you deserve on multiple choice tests.

Strategies for Acing a Multiple Choice Test

Multiple choice testing is an efficient and effective way to assess a wide range of knowledge, skills, attitudes and abilities (Haladyna, 1999). When done well, it allows broad and even deep coverage of content in a relatively efficient way. Though often maligned, and though it is true that no single format should be used exclusively for assessment (American Educational Research Association, the American Psychological Association, and the National Council on Measurement in Education , 1999), multiple choice testing still remains one of the most commonly used assessment formats (Haladyna, 1999; McDougall, 1997).